Books and Articles

"Hidden Harmonies: The Lives and Times of the Pythagorean Theorem"
by Robert Kaplan and Ellen Kaplan
Buy at Barnes & Noble Online!

Buy at IndieBound!



Bozo Sapiens: Why to Err is Human
by Michael and Ellen Kaplan


"Out of the Labyrinth: Setting Mathematics Free"
by Robert Kaplan and Ellen Kaplan


"Chances Are . . . : Adventures in Probability"
by Ellen Kaplan and Michael Kaplan


"The Art of the Infinite: The Pleasures of Mathematics"
by Robert and Ellen Kaplan


more books...

Fundraising

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History

Disturbed by the poor quality and low level of math education in the country, three of us began The Math Circle in September 1994...

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Directions

Our courses are located on the campus of Harvard University. [learn more...]

Courses Recently Given


Sunday

Weekday

  • Are There Numbers Between Numbers?
  • Probability
  • The Pythagorean Theorem
  • Continued Fractions
  • Random Walks
  • Graph Theory

Our classes begin with a free discussion of ideas and play of invention around a developing problem; then - once insight blossoms - we link this insight formally to axioms, aiming for elegance and clarity. While the courses are mathematically rigorous, the atmosphere is friendly and relaxed. We want our students to feel free to express their ideas, to suggest their own approaches, and to make mistakes. We work in a spirit of friendship, cooperation, and enjoyment of one another.

Where are our courses located?

schedule

Past Courses

Weekday Classes

Weekend Classes

for 5-7 year olds For the Young (9-11, no Algebra):
Are There Numbers Between Numbers?
Sequences and Series
The Euclidean Algorithm
Prime Numbers
Triangular, Square etc. Numbers
Graph Theory Invariants
Iteration
Linear Functions
Big Numbers
Parity
Area, Geometry and Number
Set Theory
Polygon Construction
Map Coloring
The Euclidean Algorithm
Knots
Modular Arithmetic
Probability
Game Theory
Group Theory
Sequences and Series
Mathematical Games
Cryptography
Equidecomposibility
Polyhedra
Solving Equations
Pascal's Triangle and Fractals
Concurrency and Collinearity
Pythagorean Triples
The Intermediate Value Theorem Mathematical Origami
Steiner Points
Complementary Sequences
For 7-9 or 9-11 year olds For the Middle Group (12-14, some Algebra)

Cantorian Set Theory

Fractions and Decimals

Straight-Edge and Compass Constructions

Sequences and Series

Tiling

Eulerian and Hamiltonian Circuits

The Infinite

Interesting Numbers

Polygon Construction

Prime Numbers

Complex Numbers

Min/Max Problems

Functions and their Graphs

Logic

Concurrency

Iterations

Powers of 2

Weird Fractions

Random Walks

Area, Number and Geometry

Polyhedra

Periodic Decimals

Continued Fractions

Propositional Calculus

The Fibonacci Sequence

Solution by Radicals

Polygon Decomposition

What is ii?

Krasnoselsskii's and Brouwer's Theorem

Interesting Points in Triangles

Maxima, Minima and Optima

Angle Trisection

The Golden Mean

Which Numbers are the Sum of Two Squares?

Visual Proofs

Information Theory

The Pythagorean Theorem

Cantorian Set Theory

Conway Games

Pick's Theorem etc.,

Linear Algebra

Mathematical Origami

Integer Triangles

Complementary Sequences

Taxicab Geometry


For the Senior Group (15-17, good Algebra and Geometry)

Sequences and Series

Projective Geometry

Induction and the Pigeonhole Principle

Classification of Surfaces

The Four Color Problem

The Pythagorean Theorem

Number Theory

Proofs and Refutations

Algebraic Geometry

Complex Analysis

Cantorian Set Theory

Number Theory

Knot Theory

Hyperbolic Geometry

Group Theory

Conway's Numbers

Mathematical Logic

Information Theory

Relativity

Fractals

Proofs from The Book

Banach Tarski Paradox

Combinatorial Geometry


Sunday

Weekday

  • Are There Numbers Between Numbers?
  • Probability
  • The Pythagorean Theorem
  • Continued Fractions
  • Random Walks
  • Graph Theory

Our classes begin with a free discussion of ideas and play of invention around a developing problem; then - once insight blossoms - we link this insight formally to axioms, aiming for elegance and clarity. While the courses are mathematically rigorous, the atmosphere is friendly and relaxed. We want our students to feel free to express their ideas, to suggest their own approaches, and to make mistakes. We work in a spirit of friendship, cooperation, and enjoyment of one another.

Where are our courses located?

schedule